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Condom Water Balloon Fight, Anyone?: My Sex Education

Posted by Ryan Morgan on January 12, 2013 at 12:00 PM

I remember "the talk." My Mom was pregnant with her fourth child and she and my father were taking some time to explain to their three daughters where babies come from and why our brother was "growing in mommy's tummy." I remember that conversation very clearly because of the thoughts that were going through my head - I already know this!

I remember "the talk." My Mom was pregnant with her fourth child and she and my father were taking some time to explain to their three daughters where babies come from and why our brother was "growing in mommy's tummy." I remember that conversation very clearly because of the thoughts that were going through my head - I already know this!

 

I received sex education as a part of a health class in 5th, 7th, 9th and 11th grades. The initial classes focused on puberty and the changes that I and my classmates were about to go through. 7th grade was a review of past information and additional material about reproduction, identifying sexual abuse and harassment, healthy relationships, body image, and hygiene. By 9th and 11th grades, it was all review, but all the material was covered. The only difference was the types of questions my fellow students were asking - some much more poignant and specific than others.

 

When I graduated high school, I felt prepared to take care of myself as I entered the college. While I can't be completely sure if I learned about condoms in 7th or 9th grade, I remember the "banana demonstration" as well as the condom water balloon fight we had (to prove the strength and expandability of condoms) during a warm spring day. I bet that I use my sex education more often than my calculus classes.

 

There's an important component of my reproductive education that must be noted - I did not go to a South Carolina public school.

 

Students who attend public schools in this state miss out on vital information that leads to confident, prepared, and educated young adults. Sex education empowers young people and involves them in their own health care decisions.

 

Whatever their life choices are down the road, 99% of people are going to have sex at some point in their lives - shouldn't they be taught about how to keep themselves healthy? By receiving a comprehensive sex education curriculum, I was fully aware of the dangers and consequences of my actions and what sex could lead to - which is why I waited to have sex!

 

Teaching young people about the their own bodies and how to keep themselves safe, happy and healthy is key component to s good education. All South Carolina students deserve to have comprehensive, medically-accurate, age-appropriate sex education classes.


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